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  • Papua Post 4:00 am on May 4, 2010 Permalink | Balas
    Tags: , Human Rights, keamanan, , security   

    Polisi Terus Cari Solusi Kwamki Lama 

    TIMIKA [PAPOS] – Kepolisian Mimika saat ini terus berupaya untuk mencari jalan keluar penyelesaian konflik berkepanjangan antar dua kelompok warga di Kwamki Lama Timika.

    Hal itu dikatakan Kepala Kepolisian Resort Mimika AKBP. Moch Sagi saat ditemui Papua Pos di Lapangan Timika Indah seusai mengikuti Upacara Bendera Peringatan Hari Pendidikan Nasional, Senin [3/5]. Kata dia, salah satu upaya yang dilakukan adalah terus mempertemukan kedua pihak yang saling bertikai untuk mencari jalan keluar. Selain itu, pertemuan ini juga dimaksudkan agar warga kedua kubu tidak terus menerus memikirkan untuk bertikai ”Kita akan mempertemukan mereka terus sehingga dapat mencari jalan keluar permasalahan yang diinginkan kedua pihak,” ujarnya.

    Lanjut Kapolres, polisi sedang mencari akar permasalahan untuk penyelesaian konflik dengan melakukan pendekatan hukum positif, namun masyarakat juga memaksa agar polisi dapat mengakomodir penyelesaian secara adat bukan hanya dengan hukum positif”Kalo masalah dapat diselesaikan dengan cara hukum positif dan adat, kita akan lakukan dua-duanya,” ujarnya.

    Kata dia, Polisi dalam kasus ini hanya sebagai mediator dengan menampung semua aspirasi kedua pihak guna mencari solusi permasalahan yang dikehendaki dua pihak. Yang pasti keamanan di kwamki lama harus terus terjaga, jangan sampai ada lagi pertikaian karena akan terus menimbulkan jatuhnya korban yang berdampak pada semakin meluasnya masalah. ‘’Kami tidak ingin pertikaian terjadi lagi, kami sudah minta agar dua pihak meletakan panah sambil terus melakukan razia bagi warga yang membangkang,” tegas Kapolres.

    Dia juga meminta agar penyelesaian masalah Kwamki Lama bukan hanya menjadi tanggungjawab polisi tapi semua stakeholder karena polisi tidak dapat bekerja sendiri. Menurutnya, situasi kamtibmas dua hari ini berangsur-angsur aman, namun kedua pihak masih terus saling jaga karena belum ada kata sepakat untuk menyelesaikan masalah. ‘’Polisi masih terus disiagakan di Kwamki Lama sampai kondisi benar-benar aman,” kata Kapolres. [cr-56]

     

    Ditulis oleh Cr-56/Papos   
    Selasa, 04 Mei 2010 00:00

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  • Papua Post 2:37 pm on January 30, 2008 Permalink | Balas
    Tags: Human Rights, ,   

    I learn that Suharto, former genocidal dictator of Indonesia 

    In real international news, I learn that Suharto, former genocidal dictator of Indonesia, has finally kicked the bucket.  Suharto originally came to power with the backing of the US government, who trusted him to “deal with” the Communist Party of Indonesia, at that time the largest outside the Stalinist bloc.  He did this by indiscriminately slaughtering more than 600,000 people, many of them in no way connected to the Communist Party (as if that made a difference).  Hundreds of thousands more murders followed in West Papua, East Timor and Aceh.  Although he was overthrown in 1998, neither he nor his grotesquely corrupt (and consequently extremely rich) family have been brought to justice.  This impunity, again, involves the collusion of the Western powers.

    To read further here

     
  • Papua Post 12:52 pm on January 30, 2008 Permalink | Balas
    Tags: Human Rights, ,   

    Letters: SMH 29 January 2008 

    SMH 29/1/08

    I hope Kevin Rudd will not be going or sending a representative to Soeharto’s funeral. He was responsible for the deaths of half a million Indonesians in 1965, 200,000 in East Timor during Indonesia’s illegal occupation, and up to a 100,000 in West Papua since Indonesian took control of that territory in 1963. To offer condolences or attend his funeral is an insult to the families of the victims of his brutal regime.
    Joe Collins
    Australia West Papua Association, Mosman

    The Australian 29/1/08
    I KNOW we are not supposed to speak ill of the dead but let�s get real. Suharto was responsible for the deaths of at least 500,000 Indonesians in 1965, 200,000 in East Timor during Indonesia�s illegal occupation of it, and up to a 100,000 in West Papua since Indonesia took control of that territory in 1963. To offer condolences or attend his funeral would be an insult to the families of the victims of his brutal regime.
    Joe Collins
    Mosman, NSW

    The Australian 29/1/08
    THE tributes to Suharto have begged the question, could Indonesia�s development have been achieved without militarism and repression?

    Foreign governments curried favour with Suharto and his rapacious armed forces to allow primarily mining and logging companies to extract the country�s resource wealth. This support gave the green light to a ruthless process of territorial expansion and occupation. The result is that the country we know today as Indonesia was built through military force.
    The murder of countless thousands of opponents to Suharto�s brutal system was accepted as a cost of doing business with Indonesia. Commentators could turn to a survivor and ask them what Suharto�s legacy was. In the villages and towns of Papua, which are still living with military abuse and surveillance, the legacy remains an entrenched system of fear.
    In giving the Javanese peasantry their much-needed hand-up, Suharto enriched his cronies and oversaw massive environmental destruction through resource exploitation across the archipelago. Yet had he for one second during those 32 years suggested a change to the way business was done and jeopardised the profits of multinationals, Suharto may have become the international community�s public enemy number one.
    John Wing
    Research Fellow,
    Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies,
    University of Sydney

     
  • Papua Post 12:51 pm on January 30, 2008 Permalink | Balas
    Tags: Human Rights,   

    The Oz on Suharto: at least the regime ran on time 

    rom crikey.com.au

    Jeff Sparrow writes:

    Ever wonder how official history would have assessed Saddam Hussein, had he not rashly interpreted US ambassador April Glaspie’s comments (“we have no opinion on the Arab-Arab conflicts, like your border disagreement with Kuwait”) as a green light to invade that country?

    Check The Australian�s obituary for General Suharto and wonder no more. If Saddam had survived throughout the nineties as a loyal counterweight to Iran, he too could have been as a “strong, successful leader who got things done in a way that had rarely happened previously.”

    “Saddam Hussein was certainly authoritarian,” opines the Oz, “and relied on the armed forces for support, but he was also pragmatic, secular and opposed to Islamic extremism.”

    Oops! The passage above actually refers to Suharto. But you can see how the thing is done.

    How would have our hypothetical obituarist handled the ticklish subject of the 150,000 people Saddam murdered? The Australian again:

        There is, of course, much to be said against Suharto. Over three decades of his New Order regime, he utilised the military to impose a central government over an unlikely nation. Millions of people were killed in brutal crackdowns on communists and Chinese Indonesians.

    �There were widespread human rights abuses, especially but not only in East Timor, Aceh and West Papua, and pervasive corruption� For all his failings, Suharto had many significant achievements.

    Ah, that wonderful passive voice, so beloved by apologists. Millions (let�s say that again: millions!) of people were killed � but not, apparently, by anyone in particular. The deaths just happened, probably of their own accord: who can say?

    Besides, it�s swings and roundabouts, snakes and ladders: on the one hand, mass murder on an almost genocidal scale; on the other, economic development and stability in the region.

    As Tim Colebatch says in The Age, “I [do not] understand those who focus entirely on the massacres, the human rights violations and the corruption without conceding that Soeharto then used his power intelligently to guide Indonesia on a path of rapid economic growth�”

    In that case, RIP Saddam Hussein! Wiki explains, “Saddam’s organizational prowess was credited with Iraq’s rapid pace of development in the 1970s; development went forward at such a fevered pitch that two million persons from other Arab countries and Yugoslavia worked in Iraq to meet the growing demand for labor.”

    As for stability, why, Iraq under Saddam was rock-solid, what with the secret police and torture rooms and all.

    Which is why a Hussein who remained a state department pet might even have posthumously enjoyed some of the verbal fel-atio that Greg Sheridan dispenses whenever a tyrant�s in the offing:

    Indonesia�s Suharto was an authentic giant of Asia, a nation-builder, a dictator, a changer of history. He was also, for Australia, the most important and beneficial Asian leader in the entire period after World War II. This was once a widely held view among senior Australian policy-makers�Suharto wasa prime mover of history and his rule was of immeasurable benefit to Australia.

    Of course, Sheridan knows he can only write that kind of stuff about mass murderers who specialised in exterminating the lesser races. Imagine the jowl-flapping fury of the Oz�s pundits were someone to stress the positive side of killing a million or so Americans!

    But when little Freddie gags at discovering the origins of the tasty pork he enjoys, his kind mother replies: “Don�t worry, son � the pigs are used to it.”

    Presumably, it�s the same with Indonesians and Timorese. They�re used to it � and if massacring a million. Untermenschen was of “immeasurable benefit to Autralia”, well, everyone likes crispy bacon for breakfast, don�t they?

    Poor old Saddam. If he hadn�t got too cocky, his crimes would have been just as casually absolved. After all, the indifference to the toll from the Iraq occupation suggests that, unless we�re drumming up support for new wars, dead Arabs count even less than Indonesians.

    Send your letters to boss@crikey.com.au

     
  • Papua Post 12:47 pm on January 30, 2008 Permalink | Balas
    Tags: Human Rights, ,   

    The Telegraph was right to highlight the millions killed under Suharto’s regime 

    Dear Sir,

    The Telegraph was right to highlight the millions killed under Suharto’s regime (Suharto’s death revives memories of the millions killed under his rule, 28 January 2008).

    His regime was responsible for a large number of human rights violations, including the deaths of over half a million political opponents, the effective censorship of the media and the banning of political dissent.

    However, Amnesty International is deeply concerned that very few people have been brought to justice for their part in these atrocities. All the victims should also receive due compensation and reparations as a matter of priority.

    In addition, the general situation in the country remains a concern for Amnesty International. Peaceful demonstrators have been killed by the security forces, discrimination remains widespread, and individuals continue to be persecuted for expressing their desire for independence in the Indonesian regions of Moluku and Papua.

    Amnesty International hopes that Indonesia can now deliver justice for the millions that suffered under Suharto, while breaking with the past and improving human rights for present and future generations.

    Yours faithfully,

    Kate Allen
    Director of Amnesty International UK
    ——————————————————————————————————

    Dear Sir,

    I read with interest your article on the death of General Suharto, the former president of Indonesia (Daughter calls for forgiveness as ex-dictator Suharto dies, 28 January 2008).

    Forgiveness is one thing, but we should not forget the large number of human rights violations conducted in his name.

    Suharto’s regime was responsible for deaths of over half a million political opponents, the effective censorship of the media and the banning of political dissent.

    It remains a deep regret to Amnesty International that very few people have ever been tried for their part in these crimes.

    All those responsible should be brought to justice, and victims should receive due compensation and reparations as a matter of priority.

    The general situation in Indonesia remains a concern for Amnesty International. Peaceful demonstrators have been killed by the security forces, discrimination remains widespread and individuals continue to be persecuted for expressing their desire for independence in the Indonesian regions of Moluku and Papua.

    Amnesty International hopes that Indonesia can now deliver justice for the millions that suffered under Suharto, while breaking with the past and improving human rights for present and future generations.

    Yours faithfully,

    Kate Allen
    Director of Amnesty International UK

     
    • vigilanteman 11:50 pm on Januari 31, 2008 Permalink | Balas

      Let’s say Mr. Soeharto, his family and cronies were big contractors in Indonesia.
      All the money for the construction found its way into their pockets.
      Whats left is a big building badly managed and of poor quality.

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