The Telegraph was right to highlight the millions killed under Suharto’s regime

Dear Sir,

The Telegraph was right to highlight the millions killed under Suharto’s regime (Suharto’s death revives memories of the millions killed under his rule, 28 January 2008).

His regime was responsible for a large number of human rights violations, including the deaths of over half a million political opponents, the effective censorship of the media and the banning of political dissent.

However, Amnesty International is deeply concerned that very few people have been brought to justice for their part in these atrocities. All the victims should also receive due compensation and reparations as a matter of priority.

In addition, the general situation in the country remains a concern for Amnesty International. Peaceful demonstrators have been killed by the security forces, discrimination remains widespread, and individuals continue to be persecuted for expressing their desire for independence in the Indonesian regions of Moluku and Papua.

Amnesty International hopes that Indonesia can now deliver justice for the millions that suffered under Suharto, while breaking with the past and improving human rights for present and future generations.

Yours faithfully,

Kate Allen
Director of Amnesty International UK
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Dear Sir,

I read with interest your article on the death of General Suharto, the former president of Indonesia (Daughter calls for forgiveness as ex-dictator Suharto dies, 28 January 2008).

Forgiveness is one thing, but we should not forget the large number of human rights violations conducted in his name.

Suharto’s regime was responsible for deaths of over half a million political opponents, the effective censorship of the media and the banning of political dissent.

It remains a deep regret to Amnesty International that very few people have ever been tried for their part in these crimes.

All those responsible should be brought to justice, and victims should receive due compensation and reparations as a matter of priority.

The general situation in Indonesia remains a concern for Amnesty International. Peaceful demonstrators have been killed by the security forces, discrimination remains widespread and individuals continue to be persecuted for expressing their desire for independence in the Indonesian regions of Moluku and Papua.

Amnesty International hopes that Indonesia can now deliver justice for the millions that suffered under Suharto, while breaking with the past and improving human rights for present and future generations.

Yours faithfully,

Kate Allen
Director of Amnesty International UK